FAQs

How were Opportunity Zones created?

Opportunity Zones were added to the tax code by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act on December 22, 2017.

Have Opportunity Zones been around a long time?

No, they are new. The first set of Opportunity Zones, covering parts of 18 states, were designated on April 9, 2018. Opportunity Zones have now been designated covering parts of all 50 states, the District of Columbia and five U.S. territories.

How do Opportunity Zones spur economic development?

Opportunity Zones are designed to spur economic development by providing tax benefits to investors. First, investors can defer tax on any prior gains invested in a Qualified Opportunity Fund (QOF) until the earlier of the date on which the investment in a QOF is sold or exchanged, or December 31, 2026. If the QOF investment is held for longer than 5 years, there is a 10% exclusion of the deferred gain. If held for more than 7 years, the 10% becomes 15%. Second, if the investor holds the investment in the Opportunity Fund for at least ten years, the investor is eligible for an increase in basis of the QOF investment equal to its fair market value on the date that the QOF investment is sold or exchanged.

What is a Qualified Opportunity Fund?

A Qualified Opportunity Fund is an investment vehicle that is set up as either a partnership or corporation for investing in eligible property that is located in a Qualified Opportunity Zone.

Do I need to live in an Opportunity Zone to take advantage of the tax benefits?

No. You can get the tax benefits, even if you don’t live, work or have a business in an Opportunity Zone. All you need to do is invest a recognized gain in a Qualified Opportunity Fund and elect to defer the tax on that gain.

I am interested in knowing where the Opportunity Zones are located. Is there a list of Opportunity Zones available?

Contact us at (720)588-2000 for a full list of available Opportunity Zones

 

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Disclaimer

To be an accredited investor, an individual must have had earned income that exceeded $200,000 (or $300,000 together with a spouse) in each of the prior two years and “reasonably expects the same for the current year,” according to the SEC.

Or, the individual must have a net worth of more than $1 million, either alone or together with a spouse. With the passage of the Dodd-Frank Act, this now excludes a primary residence as being eligible as part of an investor’s net worth (investors who had existing accredited investments but who now fail the net-worth test without their residence being valued were grandfathered).

The information, suggestions, and recommendations included in this material is for informational purposes only and cannot be relied upon for any financial, legal or insurance purposes. APO Financial will not be held responsible for any detrimental reliance you place on this information. It is agreed that use of this information shall be on an “as is” basis and entirely at your own risk. Additionally, APO Financial cannot and does not guarantee the performance of any investment or insurance product. Insurance products are offered through APO Financial, a licensed insurance agency and affiliate of Horter Investment Management, LLC. APO Financial and individual advisors affiliated with APO Financial and Horter Investment Management, LLC receives commissions on the sale of insurance products. Clients are not required to purchase insurance products recommended or to otherwise implement financial advice through APO Financial affiliates. Horter Investment Management, LLC is a registered investment adviser with the SEC. Our registration with the SEC or with any state securities authority does not imply a certain level of skill or training. Opportunity Zone investments are only available to accredited investors and are offered solely through the issuers offering documents. The Opportunity Zone sponsor determines whether to accept any individual’s subscription documents.